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Empirical SCOTUS: Hitting the nail on the head — successful cert-stage amicus briefs in cases with financial implications

Not surprisingly, most cases before the Supreme Court involve high stakes. The justices can assure this by taking a small and selective caseload each term. With so many potential cases petitioned to the court on such a wide range of issues, the court really has the pick of the litter in terms of possible cases […]
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February 12, 2019/by Adam Feldman

Argument preview: Justices to consider ability of government to challenge patents in administrative process

The justices have a light calendar for the first week of the February session, with only two cases set for argument. The first of the pair is Return Mail Inc. v. U.S. Postal Service, the lone Tuesday argument. Return Mail is a simple statutory case asking the justices to resolve another of the seemingly endless […]
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February 12, 2019/by Ronald Mann

Tuesday round-up

In an op-ed for The New York Times, Alan Cross weighs in on the court’s 5-4 decision last week to allow Alabama to execute a Muslim inmate who had challenged Alabama’s refusal to permit an imam to be by his side when he died, noting that “[w]hat has gone largely unnoticed, but is in fact […]
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February 12, 2019/by Edith Roberts

Court releases April calendar

The Supreme Court has released its calendar for the April sitting, which begins on April 15. Unlike the February and March sittings, which will feature only six and nine hours of argument, respectively, the April sitting is scheduled to have a full slate of 12 oral arguments – two on each of the six days […]
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February 11, 2019/by Amy Howe

Symposium: Clarity of the record should bring clarity of purpose

Justin Levitt is a professor at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles; he runs the website “All About Redistricting.” Partisan gerrymandering is back. There are two cases before the Supreme Court this term: a Democratic gerrymander in Maryland and a Republican gerrymander in North Carolina. The cases are different – and though neither is perfect, the […]
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February 11, 2019/by Justin Levitt

OT2018 #18: “Rorschach Test”

We thought it’d be a quiet week, but the Supreme Court had other plans. Amy Howe joins to catch us up on the news. We also get a taste of American University law professor Robert Tsai’s new book, “Practical Equality: Forging Justice i...
February 11, 2019/by First Mondays

Monday round-up

Amy Howe covers last week’s Supreme Court news, including action “in cases asking the justices to intervene in cases involving the death penalty and abortion,” in a podcast at Howe on the Court. At First Mondays (podcast), Howe joins the hosts to expand on those topics. At The Daily Signal, Elizabeth Slattery observes that after […]
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February 11, 2019/by Edith Roberts

Bankruptcy Wipes Out Debts

Wasson & Thornhill -
You know bankruptcy wipes out debts. But WHEN it does so is very different with Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13. Either way, at the end they are gone.   The main goal of most consumer bankruptcy cases is to get a fresh financial start through writing off debts.  The legal bankruptcy term for write-off is “discharge.” In virtually all successful ... Read More
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February 11, 2019/by Wasson and Thornhill

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