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Justices allow Tennessee execution to go forward, but inmate still gets temporary reprieve

Tennessee had planned to execute Edmund Zagorski, who is on death row for the 1984 murders of John Dale Dotson and Jimmy Porter, tonight. The Supreme Court would have allowed the execution to go forward, but the state’s governor gave Zagorski a brief reprieve to provide the state with enough time to prepare the electric […]
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October 12, 2018/by Amy Howe

Argument analysis: Are there limits to the government’s power to detain immigrants without a hearing?

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in the case of Nielsen v. Preap, which involves a challenge to the government’s interpretation of one of the Immigration and Nationality Act’s detention provisions: 8 U.S.C. § 1226(c). The relevant portion of 8 U.S.C. § 1226(c)(1) states that the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security […]
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October 11, 2018/by Jennifer Chacon

Argument analysis: Justices search for clear path to assessing responsibility for asbestos-dependent equipment on ships at sea

Wednesday morning the justices got a rare opportunity to ponder basic principles of tort law, as they closed the October session with the argument in Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries. The case involves equipment sold by various manufacturers (including petitioner Air and Liquid Systems) that was installed many years ago on Navy ships. The […]
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October 11, 2018/by Ronald Mann

Thursday round-up

Yesterday the court heard argument in Nielsen v. Preap, which involves the immigration law’s mandatory detention provision. Robert Barnes reports for The Washington Post that “President Trump’s two nominees to the Supreme Court might play key roles in deciding the rights of some immigrants to challenge their detention during deportation hearings,” “[b]ut it wasn’t clear […]
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October 11, 2018/by Edith Roberts

Relist Watch

John Elwood reviews Tuesday’s relisted cases. We have a new justice and so of course, everything’s back to normal at the Supreme Court. Maybe because it’s a time of change, we had a fairly status quo conference this week. Perhaps Chief Justice John Roberts decided to hang on to all of the long-conference relists so […]
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October 10, 2018/by John Elwood

Argument transcripts

The transcript in Nielsen v. Preap is available on the Supreme Court’s website; the transcript in Air and Liquid Systems Corp. v. DeVries is also available.
 

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October 10, 2018/by Andrew Hamm

Empirical SCOTUS: What to expect from Kavanaugh’s first term

The tense waiting is now over as Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court on October 6, 2018. One of the big stories about Kavanaugh has been his low rate of public approval. This low rate of approval was apparent soon after Kavanaugh was nominated. Not only this, but as the figure below […]
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October 10, 2018/by Adam Feldman

Empirical SCOTUS: What to expect from Kavanaugh’s first term

The tense waiting is now over as Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court on October 6, 2018. One of the big stories about Kavanaugh has been his low rate of public approval. This low rate of approval was apparent soon after Kavanaugh was nominated. Not only this, but as the figure below […]
The post Empirical SCOTUS: What to expect from Kavanaugh’s first term appeared first on SCOTUSblog.
October 10, 2018/by Adam Feldman

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